Americans reject post-election violence

The prospect of violence and those who have acted out understandably captured our attention. But we need as much emphasis on Americans’ overwhelming rejection of violence.

By

Opinion

December 18, 2020 - 2:39 PM

Supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump rally at Freedom Plaza in Washington, D.C, on December 12, 2020, to protest the 2020 election. (Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images/TNS)

Alarm bells have been sounding since early fall about the possibility of widespread civil unrest after the election. Those warnings have been warranted, because instances of political violence have occurred, raising Americans’ continued fears fully six weeks after the election.

Our most recent data, from before Election Day, found that 71% of Americans would be worried about the risk of widespread violence across the country after the results of the presidential election became clear.

The prospect of violence and those who have acted out understandably captured our attention. But we need as much emphasis on Americans’ overwhelming rejection of violence.

Related
January 22, 2021
January 7, 2021
January 7, 2021
October 28, 2020