Holding out hope for police reform

One year has gone by since former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin killed George Floyd by kneeling on his back and neck for nine minutes and 29 seconds.

By

Opinion

May 26, 2021 - 8:29 AM

A child views a mural dedicated to George Floyd, across the street from the Cuney Homes housing project in Houston's Third Ward, where Floyd grew up and later mentored young men, on June 10, 2020 in Houston, Texas. (Mario Tama/Getty Images/TNS)

 One year has gone by since former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin killed George Floyd by kneeling on his back and neck for nine minutes and 29 seconds. Floyd pleaded “Mama! Mama!” and eventually fell silent, while horrified onlookers watched and recorded on their phones. Those videos allowed the whole world to see the agony, the excruciating cruelty, of a Black man slowly having the life crushed out of his body.

Last month a jury correctly convicted Chauvin for Floyd’s murder, meting out welcome justice.

But just like the “Black Lives Matter” slogan painted in huge yellow letters on Fifth Avenue in New York last summer, hopes that Congress will enact larger, federal reforms to policing, reforms that could prevent more people from dying the way Floyd did, are fading, falling victim to time, and inertia.

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