Found a baby bird? Many times it’s best to leave it alone

As much as I love to help, the answer is often “Don’t do anything!”

Opinion

May 20, 2021 - 9:02 AM

It's natural to want to scoop up a vulnerable-looking fledgling bird. But in many cases, doing so can actually hurt an animals' chances for survival. (Dreamstime/TNS)

In my neighborhood, I’m known as the “animal person.” People ask me for help and advice on everything from getting a lost dog back home safely to identifying the species of frog they heard croaking the night before. This time of year, I can count on receiving at least one call, text or knock on my door, followed by, “I found a baby bird! What should I do?”

As much as I love to help, the answer is often “Don’t do anything!”

People are surprised to hear this. It’s natural to want to scoop up a vulnerable-looking fledgling bird, squirrel pup or baby bunny. But in many cases, doing so can actually hurt — rather than help — animals’ chances for survival.

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