Armstrong used courts to bully truth-tellers

"I had a front row seat watching the court system be manipulated. Being married to Lance Armstrong’s agent (now ex-husband) meant seeing a legal strategy play out where the judicial system was used to silence those who dared to speak the truth about Armstrong’s doping. It also meant seeing the truth-tellers’ lives ruined along the way."

By

Opinion

March 15, 2021 - 8:27 AM

After winning the 1999 Tour de France, Lance Armstrong takes a victory lap on the Champs Elysees in Paris. (Patrick Kovarik/AFP/Getty Images/TNS)

I had a front row seat watching the court system be manipulated. Being married to Lance Armstrong’s agent (now ex-husband) meant seeing a legal strategy play out where the judicial system was used to silence those who dared to speak the truth about Armstrong’s doping. It also meant seeing the truth-tellers’ lives ruined along the way. 

Armstrong lied about his years of rampant performance-enhancing drug use. His vehement denials survived in part because, each time a truth-teller challenged him, Armstrong retaliated by slapping them with a lawsuit. After years and millions in legal fees and settlements, the truth finally vindicated these voices. In 2012, The United States Doping Agency issued its “Reasoned Decision,” citing mountains of proof of Armstrong’s performance-enhancing drug use. 

In an about face, Armstrong did a “tell-all” interview with Oprah Winfrey, admitting to doping. He also conceded that he was nothing more than a bully who had sued the journalists, friends, and colleagues who had accused him of doping: 

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