Reforming Electoral Count Act should not be controversial

After the November general election, Congress’ focus will turn to the 2024 presidential race. Good luck getting any meaningful election reforms passed then.

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Editorials

September 26, 2022 - 4:46 PM

Vice President Mike Pence and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi preside over the certification of the 2020 Electoral College results after supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the Capitol earlier in the day on Jan. 6, 2021. Both Pence and Pelosi were targets of the terrorists. A mock gallows and noose was constructed on the Capitol grounds with Pence as their target. Once the rioters broke into the Capitol, shouts of “Where’s Nancy?” rang through its halls. (J. Scott Applewhite/AFP/GettyImages/TNS)

The U.S. House of Representatives last week passed a bill to reform how Congress certifies electors after a presidential election. That bill (or a similar but slightly weaker Senate one) needs to pass the Senate now.

After the November general election, Congress’ focus will turn to the 2024 presidential race. Good luck getting any meaningful election reforms passed then.

Ostensibly, the Presidential Election Reform Act is a response to the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol and its aftermath. When Congress reconvened, 147 Republican representatives and senators voted against certifying that President Joe Biden had won. There also were desperate machinations to convince then-Vice President Mike Pence to throw out the election result.

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