Police: Shooting after rally seemed to stem from dispute among several people

Investigators continue to pore through information surrounding the shooting that killed one and injured 21 others following Wednesday's Super Bowl rally for the Kansas City Chiefs.

By

Sports

February 15, 2024 - 2:52 PM

A man is detained by law enforcement following a shooting at Union Station during the Kansas City Chiefs Super Bowl LVIII victory parade on Feb. 14, 2024, in Kansas City, Missouri. On Thursday afternoon, two teenagers remained in custody, while a third person, an adult, was released. Photo by David Eulitt/Getty Images/TNS

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A historic railway station on the edge of downtown Kansas City became the latest backdrop for a mass shooting as gunfire near the end of the Kansas City Chiefs’ Super Bowl celebration sent terrified fans scrambling for cover and left 21 people wounded — including at least eight children — and a mother of two dead.

Wednesday’s shooting outside Union Station happened despite the presence of more than 800 police officers who were in the building and nearby, including on top of nearby structures, said Mayor Quinton Lucas, who attended with his wife and mother and ran for safety when the shots rang out.

“Parades, rallies, schools, movies. It seems like almost nothing is safe,” Lucas said.

Three people were detained and firearms were recovered, Police Chief Stacey Graves said at an evening news conference. She said police were still piecing together what happened and did not release details about those who were detained or a possible motive.

“I’m angry at what happened today. The people who came to this celebration should expect a safe environment,” Graves said.

It is the latest sports celebration in the U.S. to be marred by gun violence, following a shooting that wounded several people last year in Denver after the Nuggets’ NBA championship, and gunfire last year at a parking lot near the Texas Rangers’ World Series championship parade.

Social media users posted shocking video of police running through Wednesday’s crowded scene as people scrambled for cover and fled. One video showed someone apparently performing chest compressions on a victim as another person, seemingly writhing in pain, lay on the ground nearby. People screamed in the background.

Another video showed two people chase and tackle a person, holding them down until two police officers arrived. In an interview Thursday with ABC’s “Good Morning America,” Trey Filter of Wichita, Kansas, said he saw someone being chased and took action.

“I couldn’t see much. I heard, ‘Get ‘em!’ I saw a flash next to me. And I remember I jumped and remember thinking, ‘I hope this is the fool they were talking about,'” he said. “They started yelling that, ‘There’s a gun, there’s a gun!’”

Filter said he and another man kept the person pinned down until officers arrived. “I remember the officers pulling my feet off of him and at that point I was just looking for my wife and kids.” It was not immediately clear if the person he held down was involved in the shooting, but Filter’s wife, Casey, saw a gun nearby and picked it up,

“There honestly was not much to think about except just my husband and my kids,” Casey Filter said. “And then a gun I saw obviously, there. I was just wanting everyone to be safe. That was my main concern.”

The woman killed in the shooting was identified by radio station KKFI as Lisa Lopez-Galvan, host of “Taste of Tejano.”

“This senseless act has taken a beautiful person from her family and this KC Community,” KKFI said in a statement on its Facebook page.

Lopez-Galvan, whose DJ name was “Lisa G,” was an extrovert and devoted mother from a prominent Latino family in the area, said Rosa Izurieta and Martha Ramirez, two childhood friends who worked with her at a staffing company. Izurieta said Lopez-Galvan attended the parade with her husband and her adult son, a die-hard Kansas City sports fan who also was shot.

“She’s the type of person who would jump in front of a bullet for anybody — that would be Lisa,” Izurieta said.

Kansas City has long struggled with gun violence, and in 2020 it was among nine cities targeted by the U.S. Justice Department in an effort to crack down on violent crime. In 2023 the city matched a record with 182 homicides, most of which involved guns.

Related
February 5, 2021
April 10, 2020
February 6, 2020
February 4, 2020